Eckhart von Hochheim O.P. (1260 – 1328), commonly known as Meister Eckhart [ˈmaɪ̯stɐ ˈɛkʰaʀt], was a German theologian, philosopher and mystic, born near Gotha, in the Landgraviate of Thuringia.

Eckhart came into prominence during the Avignon Papacy, at a time of increased tensions between monastic orders, diocesan clergy, the Franciscan Order and Eckhart's Dominican Order of Preachers.

He was well known for his work with pious lay groups, such as the Friends of God, and was succeeded by his disciples John Tauler and Henry Suso. Since the 19th century, he has received renewed attention. He has acquired status as a great mystic within contemporary spirituality, as well as considerable interest by scholars recognizing him as medieval scholastic in the mystical tradition.